Wednesday, June 29, 2016

What is in your heart?

The peacemakers are pronounced blessed, they namely
who make peace first within their own hearts, then
between brethren at variance.
For what avails it to make peace between others,
while in your own heart
there are wars of rebellious vices?

St. Thomas Aquinas

Sts. Peter and Paul

Peter, who was named Simon, was a fisherman from Galilee. Jesus gave him the name Peter, which means ‘Rock,’ because he was to become the rock upon which Christ would build His Church. Among the Twelve, Peter was the first to recognize the divinity of Christ and to publicly profess that Jesus was the long-awaited Messiah. Chosen by Our Lord to shepherd His flock, he led the Apostles as the first Pope.

Peter and the apostles James and John were often taken aside by Our Lord and were witnesses to the more profound mysteries of Christ's divinity: His Transfiguration on Mount Tabor, His agony in the Garden. Peter's triple denial of Our Lord during the night after the Last Supper filled him with intense sorrow.

Peter became head of the Church in Rome and was martyred in the year 64. He was crucified upside-down at his own request, because he claimed he was not worthy to die as his Lord. He was buried on Vatican hill, and St. Peter's Basilica is built over his tomb.

Paul is known as the Apostle of the Gentiles. Before receiving the name Paul, he was Saul, a Jewish Pharisee who zealously persecuted Christians in Jerusalem.

Saul was traveling to Damascus to persecute Christians when he was surrounded by a light from heaven. He was blinded and fell from his horse. He then heard a voice saying to him, “Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?” He answered: “Who are you, Lord?” Christ said: “I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting.”

Saul continued to Damascus, where he was baptized and his sight was restored. He took the name Paul and spent the remainder of his life preaching the Gospel to the Gentiles.

Paul was imprisoned and taken to Rome, where he was beheaded in the year 67. He is buried in Rome in the Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls.

In speaking of St. Peter and St. Paul, Augustine of Hippo said of them: “Both apostles share the same feast day, for these two were one; and even though they suffered on different days, they were as one. Peter went first, and Paul followed. And so we celebrate this day made holy for us by the apostles' blood. Let us embrace what they believed, their life, their labors, their sufferings, their preaching, and their confession of faith.”

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Family Tips: Enrollment of the Sacred Heart of Jesus as King in Your Home


“To restore all things in Christ” ~ Saint Pius X

This devotion was introduced to the world by Fr. Mateo Crawley-Boevey with approval of several popes such as St. Pius X, Benedict XV and Pius XI. Fr. Mateo, a priest from Chile traveled the world including the United States in 1940.

 
Benefits of this devotion
Our Lord’s promises:
1)   “I will bless every place where an image of My Heart shall be exposed and honored.”
2)   “I will give them all the graces necessary for their state in life.”
3)   “I will establish peace in their families.”
4)   “I will comfort them in their trials.”
*The above promises were taken from the 12 promises made by Our Lord to St. Margaret Mary Alocoque in 1673.

How to make it happen:
1)   Obtain a beautiful picture or statue of the Sacred Heart of Jesus.
2)   Ask your priest to come to enthrone the Sacred Heart in your home.
Note: In the event a priest is not available, there may be a lay member or “promoter” in charge of this apostolate in your parish. Even the father or mother of the house may lead the prayers in this simple, yet powerful, ceremony.
3)   If possible, make this a special occasion by inviting some of your friends and family.
      This will help others pick up the same idea for their own homes.
4)   Print up the prayers for the participants to follow. (click here for prayers)
5)   Prepare some refreshments for after the Enthronement ceremony.

The ceremony
The steps in the ceremony are:
1)   An opening hymn or prayer to the Sacred Heart of Jesus;
2)   An explanation of the meaning of the Enthronement;
3)   The blessing of the image or statue of the Sacred Heart by the priest;
4)   Placement of the image of the Sacred Heart in a place of honor in the home;
5)   The Act of Consecration to the Sacred Heart;
6)   A closing hymn (optional).




 

Refuge and path

“My Immaculate Heart
will be your refuge
and the way that will lead you to God.”

Our Lady to Sister Lucia dos Santos

St. Irenaeus of Lyon

Irenaeus was born around the year 125 in a province in Asia Minor. He was a brilliant student and well versed in the Holy Scriptures, which led him to serve as a priest under St. Pothinus, the first bishop of a local church.

His fellow clergy thought highly of him, so highly, in fact, that in 177 when the persecution of Catholics in Lyon in France began, they sent him away to Rome because St. Pothinus wanted to preserve him from martyrdom.

Irenaeus returned to Lyon and became a bishop. He remained a bishop for about twenty years, wrote several works against heresy and dedicated his life to evangelizing. He died around the year 202, and is known as one of the most distinguished theologians of his time.

Monday, June 27, 2016

Without anxiety

Let us learn to keep a perfectly even temper,
so important to our spiritual life, and
a harmonious state of mind so that
we may face all situations without anxiety.

St. Joseph Marello

St. Cyril of Alexandria

Cyril was born in Alexandria, Egypt, in 376, and was the nephew of Theophilus, the patriarch of the city. When his uncle died in 412, Cyril took his position on the see of Alexandria.  He soon began a series of attacks against the Novatians, a religion started by the antipope Novatian. He closed their churches and drove Jews from the city.

In 428, Cyril discovered that the priest/monk Nestorius, the Archbishop of Alexandria, was preaching heretical theology. Cyril sent the heretic a mild expostulation, but to no avail. Both parties then appealed to Pope St. Clementine, and Cyril was appointed to depose Nestorius. In 431, Cyril presided over the Third General Council at Ephesus, attended by some two hundred bishops, which condemned all the tenets of Nestorius and his followers. However, upon the arrival of Archbishop John of Antioch and forty-two followers who believed Nestorius to be innocent, they held a council of their own and deposed Cyril. Emperor Theodosius II had both Cyril and Nestorius arrested but released Cyril on the arrival of papal legates who confirmed the council's actions against Nestorius and declared Cyril innocent of all charges leveled against him.

Two years later, Archbishop John, representing the moderate Antiochene bishops, and Cyril reached an agreement and issued a joint condemnation, and Nestorius was forced into exile.

Cyril died in 444 at Antioch. He was named a Doctor of the Church in 1882.